<$BlogRSDURL$>

Wednesday, February 18, 2004

"I am the music"
Billboard interview with Timba. Pardon the CAPS. Too lazy to change them.

Q: WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS FACING THE MUSIC INDUSTRY TODAY, AND WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE SOLUTIONS?
A: There’s too much being developed at once. There’s new software, new music and new programs that come out too quickly. By the time something new comes out, people are ready to move on to the next thing. That’s why people’s attention spans are short.
There are so many sites from which to download music illegally that less people want to go out and buy it. I don’t know what the solution to that would be, but I think first the record companies need to lower prices.
The “instant-hit” mentality can mean instant failure. I wish the record companies would put more effort into artist development.
I also think the major-label mergers are crazy. It’s almost like they’re playing Monopoly.
Q: WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST TECHNOLOGY CHALLENGES FACING MUSIC PRODUCERS?
A: I don’t think there’s any technology right now that can challenge the producers who are good enough to do what they do. The ones who are the best can adapt to changes in technology.
Q: DO YOU THINK PRODUCERS ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN ARTISTS, AND HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PRODUCING STYLE?
A: I think producers are bigger than the artists. We’re responsible for the sound that they have. We give them direction and bring something out of the artists that they may not realize that they have.
When I came on the scene, I was one of the people who started bringing the attention back to producers. I bought the flavor back to the meat, and I opened a lot of doors for artists and other producers.
My producing style is this: “I am the music.” The artist is the frontman for the producer.
Q: YOU’VE BEEN QUOTED AS SAYING THAT YOU WANT TO WALK AWAY FROM HIP-HOP. WHY?
A: It’s not just hip-hop. I want to walk away from music, period. To me, the music business is too saturated, and there’s too much politics with the record companies and radio.
I’m not walking away right away. I’ll probably do another Missy Elliott album. But there’s too much going on with the illegal downloading and other problems in the music industry.
And I’ve gotten bored with hip-hop. I’m about to totally change my whole image in 2004. It’s going to shock people.
Q: WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO THAT WILL BE SO SHOCKING?
A: I can’t say right now, but it will involve endorsements and TV.
Q: IF HIP-HOP HAS BECOME BORING, WHAT KIND OF MUSIC EXCITES YOU, AND WHAT TYPE OF MUSIC DO YOU THINK CAN HELP THE INDUSTRY OUT OF ITS SLUMP?
A: I like Coldplay — that’s real music to me. I like what the Neptunes are doing. But after a while, everything sounds the same — even my stuff.
Q: YOU’RE A PRODUCER, SONGWRITER, ENGINEER, REMIXER, HEAD OF A RECORD LABEL AND AN ARTIST. WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU’VE LEARNED, AND WHICH ROLE IS THE MOST SATISFYING TO YOU?
A: The most important thing I’ve learned is to always have that ambition to keep fresh and always challenge yourself. I’m always competing with myself.
I spend most of my time making music, but I can’t say what role is most important to me. It depends on how I’m feeling and what I’m doing at the time.
Q: WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST MISTAKES ARTISTS ARE MAKING RIGHT NOW?
A: Just trying to flood the market with too much of themselves. When their record sales don’t really match all the attention they get, that’s when you know they’re overexposed.
Q: WHAT’S YOUR BIGGEST FEAR?
A: Not being hot anymore.
Q: WHAT IS GOING TO BE THE MOST IMPORTANT MUSIC TREND FOR 2004?
A: Whatever it is, I hope I can set it.

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Weblog Commenting and Trackback by HaloScan.com